Interventions to prevent and reduce physician burnout: a systematic review and meta-analysis

West CP, Dyrbye LN, Erwin PJ, Shanafelt TD
Submitted: November, 2016

Reviewed 2617 articles, of which 15 randomized trials including 716 physicians and 37 cohort studies including 2914 physicians met inclusion criteria. Overall burnout decreased from 54% to 44% (difference 10% [95% CI 5-14]; p<0·0001; I2=15%; 14 studies), emotional exhaustion score decreased from 23·82 points to 21·17 points (2·65 points [1·67-3·64]; p<0·0001; I2=82%; 40 studies), and depersonalization score decreased from 9·05 to 8·41 (0·64 points [0·15-1·14]; p=0·01; I2=58%; 36 studies). High emotional exhaustion decreased from 38% to 24% (14% [11-18]; p<0·0001; I2=0%; 21 studies) and high depersonalization decreased from 38% to 34% (4% [0-8]; p=0·04; I2=0%; 16 studies). Both individual-focused and structural or organizational strategies can result in clinically meaningful reductions in burnout among physicians

Resource Type:
  • Peer Reviewed Research
  • Tools & Instruments
Study Design:
  • Survey/Study
  • Systematic Review
  • Meta-Analysis
Category:
  • Burnout, Well-being, & Professionalism
  • HCO
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