The Professionalism Library

The Library includes peer-reviewed publications, commentaries/blogs, and issue briefs/reports relating to professionalism. The database will be periodically reviewed and updated.

Special thanks to Dr. Therese Zink, Brown University, for her work creating the extensive literature review that formed the starting point for this searchable resource on Professionalism, found here.

The Professionalism Library

The Library includes peer-reviewed publications, commentaries/blogs, and issue briefs/reports relating to professionalism. The database will be periodically reviewed and updated.

Special thanks to Dr. Therese Zink, Brown University, for her work creating the extensive literature review that formed the starting point for this searchable resource on Professionalism, found here.

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Resource Type
Study Design
Category of Professionalism
Date Published

Please note: There are no articles available prior to 1998.

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Date Published:
June,
2015
Study Design:
Category:
Medical Professionalism
Resource Type:

Professionalism of surgery

Arthur L. Rawlings, Phillip P. Shadduck, Lelan F. Sillin, Peter F. Crookes, Bruce V. MacFadyen Jr., Marian P. McDonald, Kenneth A. Forde, John D. Mellinger

There is an increasing interest in medical professionalism, both within the medical community and in the larger public domain. Understanding the professionalism of surgery requires a thoughtful examination of the phenomena of surgery, including features that make it unique among the professions. Surgical care typically begins with a problem–solution encounter, with the initial question from the surgeon to the patient, ‘‘How may I help you?’’ This is a voluntary promise of confidentiality and trust that obligates the surgeon to apply his or her requisite and assumed knowledge and skills within the context of a human–human interaction, one in which a power differential exists between the surgeon and the patient. This places the surgeon in a fiduciary relationship with the patient, and the surgeon’s values, attitudes, and behaviors—professionalism—should reflect such. This is a surgeon’s responsibility, even at personal, professional, and financial sacrifice.

Date Published:
February,
2021
Study Design:
Category:
Patient-Centered
Resource Type:

Patient complaints in general practice seen through the lens of professionalism

Pieter C Barnhoorn, Geurt Tjm Essers, Vera Nierkens, Mattijs E Numans , Walther Nka van Mook , Anneke W M Kramer

Professionalism is a key competence for physicians. Patient complaints provide a unique insight into patient expectations regarding professionalism. Research exploring the exact nature of patient complaints in general practice, especially focused on professionalism, is limited. Most unsolicited patient complaints are related to clinical problems. One-third, however, concerns professionalism issues. Not being taken seriously was the most frequent mentioned theme within the professionalism category.

Date Published:
December,
2012
Study Design:
Category:
Definitions & Frameworks
Medical Professionalism
Resource Type:

New Medical Professionalism

HJ Baek

The practice of medicine today is beset with unprecedented challenges which include public distrust in medical profession, increasing market force and strengthened management. Recently medical professional societies in UK & USA are overcoming these challenges in the way that medical professionalism is modernized in a changing society. They set 'a physician charter' and new definition of medical professionalism as a partnership. The principles of new medical professionalism are patient welfare, patient autonomy and social justice. It describes doctors' commitment to integrity, compassion, altruism, continuous improvement, excellence, working in partnership, just distribution of finite resources, maintaining trust by managing conflicts of interest and others. New professionalism support improvement of health care system for the welfare of society and the collective human dignity. Experience of rebuilding medical professionalism in UK and USA will give a lesson to Korean medical profession when they seek for solution to restore public confidence and take the leadership in Korean healthcare system.

Date Published:
July,
2015
Study Design:
Category:
Medical Teaching
Professionalism
Resource Type:

Assessment and Management of Professionalism Issues in Pathology Residency Training: Results From Surveys and a Workshop by the Graduate Medical Education Committee of the College of American Pathologists

Ronald E Domen, Michael L Talbert, Kristen Johnson, Miriam D Post, Mark D Brissette, Richard Michael Conran, Robert D Hoffman, Cindy B McCloskey, Patricia M Raciti, Cory Anthony Roberts, Amyn M Rojiani, J Allan Tucker, Suzanne Zein-Eldin Powell

We used a case-based educational approach in a workshop setting to assist program directors in the management of unprofessional behavior in residents. Eight case scenarios highlighting various aspects of unprofessional behavior by pathology residents were developed and presented in an open workshop forum at the annual pathology program director's meeting. Prior to the workshop, 2 surveys were conducted: (1) to collect data on program directors' experience with identifying, assessing, and managing unprofessional behavior in their residents and (2) to get feedback from workshop registrants on how they would manage each of the 8 case scenarios. A wide range of unprofessional behaviors have been observed by pathology program directors. Although there is occasionally general agreement on how to manage specific behaviors, there remains wide variation in how to manage many of the presented unprofessional behaviors. Remediation for unprofessional behavior in pathology residents remains a difficult and challenging process. Additional education and research in this area are warranted.

Date Published:
December,
2012
Study Design:
Category:
Professionalism
Resource Type:

Assessing Professionalism: Summary of the Working Group on Assessment of Observable Learner Performance

Elliot Rodriguez, Jeffrey Siegelman, Katrina Leone, Chad Kessler

Professionalism is one of the six Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies on which emergency medicine (EM) residents are assessed. However, very few assessment tools exist that have been rigorously evaluated in this population. One goal of the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on education research in EM was to develop a research agenda for testing and developing tools to assess professionalism in EM residents. A literature review was performed to identify existing assessment tools. Recommendations on future research directions were presented at the consensus conference, and an agenda was developed.