The Professionalism Library

The Library includes peer-reviewed publications, commentaries/blogs, and issue briefs/reports relating to professionalism. The database will be periodically reviewed and updated.

Special thanks to Dr. Therese Zink, Brown University, for her work creating the extensive literature review that formed the starting point for this searchable resource on Professionalism, found here.

The Professionalism Library

The Library includes peer-reviewed publications, commentaries/blogs, and issue briefs/reports relating to professionalism. The database will be periodically reviewed and updated.

Special thanks to Dr. Therese Zink, Brown University, for her work creating the extensive literature review that formed the starting point for this searchable resource on Professionalism, found here.

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Study Design
Category of Professionalism
Date Published

Please note: There are no articles available prior to 1998.

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Date Published:
January,
2023
Study Design:
Category:
Medical Professionalism
Resource Type:
Peer Reviewed

Teaching Medical Professionalism with a Scenario-based Approach Using Role-Playing and Reflection: A Step towards Promoting Integration of Theory and Practice

Elaheh Mianehsaz, Ali Saber, Seyed Mohammadreza Tabatabaee, Atiye Faghihi

Professionalism, as one of the core competencies of physicians, is essential for providing the patients with higher quality care. It is an abstract concept and its education and assessment need objective and operational methods. The present study aimed at teaching the concepts of professionalism based on a scenario-based approach using role-playing and reflection.

Date Published:
January,
2023
Study Design:
Category:
Professionalism
Burnout
Medical Education
Resource Type:
Letter to editor

Letter to the Editor: On the Topic of Academic Achievement, Professionalism and Burnout in Family Medicine Residents

Caitlin Davis, MD, MS; Meenu Krishnasamy, MD; Zachary J. Morgan, MS; Andrew W. Bazemore, MD, MPH; Lars E. Peterson, MD, PhD

Letter to the Editor: We greatly appreciate the thoughtful points raised in the response to our paper on the burnout and professionalism milestone attainment of family medicine resident physicians, and we appreciate the nuanced analysis of unique burnout contributors among physicians-in-training who identify as Black, Indigenous, or people of color (BIPOC). In our findings, the statistically significant associations between burnout and race (where White respondents are more likely than Black or Asian respondents to report burnout) disappear in the multilevel model. This means that, put in the context of individual-, program-, and area-level characteristics, race does not have a significant independent ability to predict burnout. As you point out though, even this equivocal result is surprising given evidence that BIPOC residents are at risk of being denied the training opportunities, leadership roles, and sometimes even expected annual training promotion afforded their White colleagues