The Professionalism Library

The Library includes peer-reviewed publications, commentaries/blogs, and issue briefs/reports relating to professionalism. The database will be periodically reviewed and updated.

Special thanks to Dr. Therese Zink, Brown University, for her work creating the extensive literature review that formed the starting point for this searchable resource on Professionalism, found here.

The Professionalism Library

The Library includes peer-reviewed publications, commentaries/blogs, and issue briefs/reports relating to professionalism. The database will be periodically reviewed and updated.

Special thanks to Dr. Therese Zink, Brown University, for her work creating the extensive literature review that formed the starting point for this searchable resource on Professionalism, found here.

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Study Design
Category of Professionalism
Date Published

Please note: There are no articles available prior to 2002.

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Date Published:
December,
2020
Study Design:
Category:
Curriculum
Medical Teaching
Resource Type:

Teaching professionalism in medical residency programs: a scoping review protocol

Saeideh Ghaffarifar, Azam Asghari-Khatooni, Amirhossein Akbarzadeh, Ahmad Pourabbas, Mehran Seif Farshad, Rasoul Masoomi, Fariborz Akbarzadeh

Professionalism is a core competency of medical residents in residency programs. Unprofessional behavior has a negative influence on patient safety, quality of care, and interpersonal relationships. The objective of this scoping review is to map the range of teaching methods of professionalism in medical residency programs (in all specialties and in any setting, whether in secondary, primary, or community care settings). For doing so, all articles which are written in English in any country, regardless of their research design and regardless of the residents' gender, year of study, and ethnic group will be reviewed.Conducting this scoping review will map the teaching methods of professionalism and will provide an inclusive evidence base to help the medical teachers in the choosing for proper teaching methods for use in their teaching practice.

Date Published:
December,
2020
Study Design:
Category:
Professionalism
Resource Type:

Using an International Role-Modeling Pedagogy to Engage First-Year Occupational Therapy Students in Learning Professionalism

Chi-Wen Chien, Sung Yu Chloe Mo, Joseph Chow

Professionalism is a core attribute for competent occupational therapists, but teaching professionalism to students is challenging for educators. The objective of this article is to investigate whether students can expand their understanding of professionalism by engaging with international role models. In addition to pre- and postclass surveys, students completed individual self-reflection reports as a course assignment. A postsemester focus group was also held.Sixty-three students completed the surveys, and 5 attended the focus group. The students showed significant improvements in their understanding of professionalism after the course (Wilcoxon signed rank Zs = 5.671–6.766, p < .001). Interviewing the role models enabled the students to become more aware of intrinsic aspects of professionalism. Major themes in the student focus group included gaining a better understanding of professionalism and committing to personal change. Some implementation challenges were also experienced.

Date Published:
November,
2020
Study Design:
Category:
Burnout
Well-Being
Professionalism
Resource Type:

Arts and Humanities to Teach Civility in Health Professions

Katherine Hall, Jennie C De Gagne

Incivility is defined as rude or disruptive behavior which may result in psychological or physiological distress for the people involved. These behaviors, which appear to be more pervasive than ever in today's society, both in academia and in the health-care system, negatively affect professionals' well-being and the workplace environment. Nurses have an obligation to practice with compassion and respect, and to develop creative solutions for addressing incivility. Education about incivility should begin in prelicensure programs for all health professions, so that students understand the behavior expected of them as professionals. When health-care professionals embody the ideals of respect and civility, they set an example for others to follow. The arts and humanities can be used as a pedagogical tool to provide innovative learning opportunities to teach these values through the affective domain of learning. This article discusses one of the creative avenues for facilitating such opportunity, the use of the arts and humanities to teach civility in health professions education.

Date Published:
November,
2020
Study Design:
Category:
Patient-Centered
Resource Type:

What is My Value as a Doctor?

Timothy P. Daaleman

A weekly habit of viewing my performance data led me to question the value of my doctoring. I tried to answer this quandary in my head for months, but it was a patient encounter that revealed what I had been searching for. As a doctor I am bound to the care of another, especially when disease, disability, or injury create any space between a patient and their personhood. I stand in the breach. To offset my data habit, I have adopted a practice that reviews my patient care and interior movements at the end of the day. The daily exercise has uncovered a pattern in which my anger, despair,